Kingfisher Wetlands, Gardens by the Bay

A new attraction at Gardens by the Bay, this is both a living laboratory, and a spot for nature lovers and photography enthusiasts.

 

The size of about two football fields, and with three zones, the Kingfisher Wetlands bring together two bodies of water, previously separate. It comprises a natural rock pool, meandering cascades that link Kingfisher Lake & Lotus Pond and a wildlife lookout shelter.

 

Courtesy Gardens by the Bay

 

By controlling the flow, aeration and quality of the water and planting over 200 mangrove plants from critically endangered native species, the wetlands offer researchers an opportunity to explore the potential of ‘blue carbon’ solution – coastal and marine ecosystems that can capture and store carbon.

 

It is a learning adventure for adults and children alike. Kingfisher Wetlands is filled with educational signages that satisfy their curious minds about the birds and animals that frequent the Wetlands.

 

Daily: 5.00am – 2.00am

 

Free admission

 

 

Mangroves
Mangroves are incredibly hardy trees. Mangroves are defined by their common ability to grow submerged in brackish water (water saltier than freshwater, but not as much saltwater). Found on coastlines, they offer critical shelters for hundreds of marine lives. Mangroves have an extraordinary ability to store carbon in their roots, reducing the amount of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Mangroves are known to be able to sequester four times more carbon than rainforests, with most of this carbon stored in the soil beneath these trees.

 

Kingfishers of the Lake and other wildlife
16 out of 40 migratory bird species spotted in Singapore are known to have stopped by the Kingfisher Wetlands.

 

Fans include several of Singapore’s nine Kingfisher species such as the White-collared Kingfisher and Common Kingfisher. The rarer guests are the White-breasted Waterhen, Scarlet-backed Flowerpecker, and Lesser Whistling Ducks.

 

Insects like the Plain Tiger Butterfly and Blue Dasher Dragonfly are frequent visitors. The Malayan Water Monitor and Smooth-coated Otter also make their appearances.